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Yim Tin Tsai

Yim Tin Tsai has much to explore but is only accessible by a ferry service on the weekend. Hire a boat from Sai Kung on the weekday and you escape the crowds. From the pier I walked up to the church and museum (both closed on weekdays) and into the village. The ruins of  the 19th century Hakka settlement are mainly untouched and bear the signs of the Catholic evangelization that happened later in the communities history. Combine a walk through the village with a wonder through the mangroves and salt plains to get the most from the trip. It’s a great place for photographers.

More information and a map HERE.

Tap Mun

Tap Mun, also known as grass island, is the best of the five islands for local culture and easy walking. The island is reasonably flat but has some great routes in the north of the island for walkers wanting to escape the crowds. Although there are no formal beaches, the waters are crystal clear and fun for paddling and rock jumping.

More information and a map HERE.

Po Toi

If getting away from the crowds is your objective it does not get much more remote than Po Toi. Known as the South Pole of Hong Kong, this small island has a myriad of small paths around it’s rocky shores and up into the hills above.

Information on how to get there and a good map can be found HERE.

Nam Sang Wei

Episode 14 Drone and Phone – Biking Nam Sang Wai the last in the series of Hong Kong’s five best bike rides. This short flat loop is perfect for a family day out, with plenty of places to explore amongst the myriad of paths that cross the wetlands. It’s also a great place to take to spot wild birds on the rivers and ponds.

See the map HERE.

South Lantau Loop

Starting at the Chi Ma Wan ferry pier this ride begins with a windy road through small villages and up onto the south Lantau road. Following the coast you will cycle along Hong Kong’s longest beach and then up into the hills to the spectacular Shek Pik reservoir. From there you join section 10 of the Lantau trail which has been adapted into a mountain bike trail. The relatively flat concrete path follows the contours of the mountains all the way back to Pui O where you can return to the Chi Ma Wan ferry or choose to tackle Nam Shan mountain for a more direct route back to Mui Wo.

Tai Mei Tuk to Sha Tin

Starting at the far end of the Tai Mei Tuk dam, I was greeted by swarms of swallows ducking and diving across the embankment to catch green fly that you also have to negotiate as you cycle the length of the dam. On a cold wet winter’s day the dam is so long that is disappears into the fog, a truly magical start to probably Hong Kong’s most popular bike ride.